Archive for the 'Kitchen' Category

Quooker

Quooker is a crane and a container from which it may boiling water directly from the tap. It all seems to function as a super-insulated water heaters in the mini format, the water is heated with electricity, and the facility will obviously be very energy efficient.

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Fruit Loop

The fruit loop was developed by one of Melbourne’s young designers, Lisa Vincitorio. Born in Australia in 1983 and alum of RMIT University in Melbourne, Lisa approached Alessi at a design convention and later signed a contract. The fruit loop is constructed from 18/10 stainless steel, has a 13.5” diameter and a height of 3.5”.

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Great Encounter by Michel De Broin

Two refrigerators, Plexiglas shape

By definition a refrigerator stands alone in its corner and, withdrawn from the world, it controls its atmosphere and protects its contents. Its door must be kept closed, otherwise it looses its cool. This withdrawal explains the isolation of refrigerators.

Is it possible to envision the encounter between two refrigerators? In this installation, two solitudes unite through a canal connecting their inside worlds. This unusual encounter produces a mist on the surface that binds them together.

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Petit Coeur’s Little Heart

After his strange carafes to decant wine “Decanter Sculptures”, the designer Etienne Meneau back this time with glasses of wine in total break with industry codes. Baptisé ” Little Heart “, de part leur forme, ils sont davantage à considérer comme des sculptures que comme des verres à dégustation. Known as “Little Heart” by their form, they are better regarded as that sculptures as tasting glasses.

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Ovetto Recycling Bin

Designed by Gianluca Solid, the term Ovetto stands for Recycling Egg. Sporting a simple yet elegant form, this dust bin has two compartments for taking care of the garbage in green style. This white oval shaped bin is chic enough to flaunt it in open and not hide it away in some corner or behind the doors. A vital yet hidden green element of this bin is that it is made out of recycled polypropylene.

Since recycling waste is the most significant act in a bid to reduce the burden of landfills, such a green bin steps in to take care that the waste is correctly disposed of and recycled too. It has small openings on the top that can take in what ever you chuck. When it is time to empty this egg, simply pull out the larger sections and dump all the collected waste in the garbage vans. Also, the sections have holes that facilitate air circulation. It is also spacious with a 15 to 17 Liter capacity.

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The Brunch by Ico Vos

Someone make me a butter cannon and I might not ever leave the kitchen.

The Brunch is a series of consumer products that celebrate the mundane. Bread Slicer facilitates even, uniform, precision – cuts. Toaster brings knowledge, skill and anticipation to the toasting of a slice of bread, set angle and force to exactly hit your plate. Cutlery perfectly aligned on Placemat is rendered invisible, the Holy Grail of table placement. Teapot records the height one is able to pour tea from. Milk and Sugar allow for meticulous taste.

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Tap for Tea

Designed by Willie Tsang of Imm Living. the teacup reminds guests to tap on the table as a symbol of gratitude when tea is served.

When you see tea-drinkers tapping the table with three fingers, do not dismiss it as a superstitious act. Instead it is a silent expression of thanks to the member of the party who has refilled their cup. This gesture recreates a tale of regal obedience.

The story takes place long ago in China and involves a Qing Dynasty emperor who ventured through his empire on anonymous visits. The emperor would reverse roles with one of his companions by trading garments. During one visit, they went into a teahouse. The true emperor poured tea for his disguised companion. The stunned companion wished to bow for the great honor but dare not risk exposing their identities. Cleverly the companion taps three fingers on the table, one finger representing his bowed head and the other two fingers representing his prostrate arms.

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